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INTERFERENCE BETWEEN COMPUTER FUTURE AND PAST EVENTS
SEPARATED BY TIME INTERVAL OF THE ORDER OF A SECUND

 

 

Gregory S.Yatskar

 

Gregory_Yatskar@yahoo.com

 

 

The results of the experiment described prove the existence of the interference of two computer events which are separated by the interval of the order of a second and do not have any causal connection defined in a traditional way.

 

KEY WORDS: non-locality, computer, precognition.

 

1. INTRODUCTION

 

The experiment constituting the subject of this article is the continuation of the vast series of experiments described in [1]. The latter has proven the existence of the influence of the artificial computer event on the performed prior to it calculations which have not been connected by the algorithm to the future event. The results presented in [1], as well as those of this article, show the ability of a macroscopic (not Quantum) mechanical system to literally feel beforehand the future. This property of a system called macroscopic non-locality has been predicted theoretically in [2-4], and found out experimentally by the authors of [5], who have discovered the correlation of the signal of the isolated from all present external influences electrode detector with the future geomagnetic activity. It is supposed that the past state of a macroscopic non-local system is influenced by a significant dissipation of energy in the future event connected to the system.

 

2. DESIGN AND PROCEDURE OF THE EXPERIMENT

 

The scheme of the experiment generally coincided with that employed in [1] and was as follows. First, computer performed the predetermined number of cycles of simple calculations producing a certain numerical result, and that computation constituted the first event. In the following second event, the computer read 1 or 0 from the table of random numbers, and according to that number performed, or did not perform, the action not connected to the results of the computation. This action consisted of creating the empty file in the memory, writing certain numbers into the file, closing the file and immediately erasing it. The idea was to find out whether it was possible, by the results of the computation, to predict the outcome of the second event.

 

The main cycle of the computations in the first event consisted of two consecutive invocations of the standard Timer program which defined the internal computer time. Those values were assigned to the variables t1 and t2, and the difference between t2 and t1 was calculated. In most cases, that difference was computer zero, but when it was non-zero, the program registered the number of the cycle in which that occurred. Having performed the predetermined number of cycles, the program proceeded to the second event, with completion of which the isolated trial was concluded.

 

The generation of the table of random numbers in the experiment described was performed, as in [1], by a real random number generator based on atmospheric radio-noise which is available on the Internet at random.org, but while in [1] the table was written into the program in advance, in the present experiment the random number was entered in the program manually, after the computer had requested the input of it having concluded the attempt to work out the prediction of the future event. That, naturally, resulted in much bigger delay between the prediction and the event, of order of a second versus milliseconds or less in [1]. The purpose of the experiment described was to find out how such an increase of the delay would affect the effectiveness of predictions.

 

Since the table of random numbers was written into the program in [1] in advance, it was appropriate to eliminate the hypothetic influence of the table records on the performance of Timer program. In order to do that, the condition by which the program performed or did not perform the random action in the second event was turned to its opposite in half of all trials in [1], and the same scheme was preserved in the experiment described. As it had been expected, this precaution did not change the statistics of the results in both cases.

 

The main experiment was preceded by preliminary experiments. During them, the conditions of the main experiment had been set, the criteria of a prediction worked out, the number of consecutive trials in a set and the number of trials in the main experiment and interval between them determined so, that the evaluated excess of right predictions over wrong ones would be at least three times greater that the statistically expected random excess.

 

3. DESCRIPTION OF RESULTS

 

The experiments were performed on the laptop computer "Toshiba" with the frequency of the processor 300 MHz and operational system Windows 98. The number of the cycles of two consecutive invocations of Timer program in a trial was 7000, and registration of the change in timer readings occurred, most often, with the period of 840-890 cycles. At the beginning of the preliminary experiments, the author entered the random number rather slow, about one number in a second, and the results of the predictions were poor, although positive, but when, through some practice in manual input, he managed to increase the rate of input to one number in 0.5 s, the effectiveness of predictions had significantly improved. The preliminary observations also demonstrated the reduction of the reliability of prediction in the course of the incessant set of trials. That is why the number of individual trials in a set had to be limited to 20, and the interval between the sets had to be not less than 18 hours.

 

The series of preliminary experiments performed to work out the criteria of prediction consisted of 34 sets, 20 trials each, which were run once a day at room temperature 19-24 C. The criteria worked out in that series and presented further turned out to be qualitatively similar to those that were put forward previously, in the course of experiments described in [1]. Below are listed the criteria which have been applied to the results of the main experiment.

If in a trial the last but one and the last, from the end of the first event (completion of 7000 cycles), registrations of the change in timer readings were separated by more than 872 and less than by 900 cycles, then the second event was likely to perform the random action, i.e., creation, filling, and destruction of a file.

If in a trial the last but one and the last registrations of the change in timer readings were separated by less than 841cycles, then the second event was likely not to perform the random action.

If in a trial the last but one and the last registrations of the change in timer readings were separated by more than 1743 and less than by 2000 cycles, then the second event was likely to perform the random action, i.e., creation, filling, and destruction of a file.

If in a trial the last but one and the last registrations of the change in timer readings were separated by more than 900 and less than by 1560 cycles, then the second event was likely not to perform the random action.

If the number of the registrations of change in timer readings during the first event of a trial (completion of 7000 cycles) was greater than 5, then the second event was likely to perform the random action.

If the number of the registrations of change in timer readings during a trial was one and the only registration was separated by 4000 or more cycles from the end of the first event (completion of 7000 cycles), then the second event was likely not to perform the random action.

Also, the observations showed, as in [1], the decrease of the effectiveness of prediction with the increase of room temperature.

 

4. COMPARISON OF PRESENT AND PREVIOUS RESULTS

 

The series of the experiments described in [1] was run on three computers of different models, at room temperature 18-26 C. It yielded 2310 predictions, and the excess of the right over wrong ones was 357, which is equal to 7.4 statistically expected excesses. To the author's opinion, such a result proves quite convincingly the existence of non-local reaction of the computer device to the future. That was an important first step, although this future was a very near one, since in [1] the table of random numbers, according to which the program performed or did not perform the action in the predicted future event, had been written into the program in advance, and the computer read the random number from it just milliseconds, or even less than that, after the prediction attempt had been completed. It is clear that the time between the prediction and the event can be increased as desired, at least theoretically, by using the scheme of "predicting the prediction" as many times as it is necessary, but that will probably cause, due to the accumulation of errors, the decrease in the effectiveness of predictions (the ratio of right predictions to the wrong ones). The latter can be also improved, in the principle, without limit, by employing a number of synchronized computing devices predicting the same event and working out the integral prediction, but this solution will create its own engineering problems. The results of the present experiment show that it is possible to predict an event 0.5 s before it will happen, and the reliability of the prediction will be high. It means that the practical applications of the effect discovered by the author can be developed soon, and without overcoming great technical difficulties.

 

Besides that, the experiment presented here is less prone to criticism from the methodological viewpoint than those described in [1]. Previously, some people noted that the experiments described in [1] are not really a prediction of the future, since the random numbers were written into the program in advance. The author is inclined to agree with that, although nobody could put forward a hypothesis explaining how a numerical record can influence the performance of Timer program, and despite that the results remained unchanged when the meaning of the random numbers in the program had been changed to the opposite. Nevertheless, the scheme, where the random number is manually put in the computer after the completion of the prediction attempt, is more close to the real situation. Also, the better control over room temperature made it possible to avoid the fragmentation of the results which was obvious in [1].

 

4. CONCLUSION

 

It is logical to suppose that in macroscopic non-local systems, similar to the phenomenon which is observed in Quantum non-local systems, influence of future events on the past ones decreases with the increase of the time interval between them. Let us denote the characteristic time of that decrease with Tc. The results of the presented in this article experiment show that the time Tc characterizing interaction of the described above and running on the particular computer program with the future artificial dissipative process created in the said computer is greater than 0.5 s, and a prediction based on the abovementioned phenomenon of macroscopic non-locality has a significant effectiveness. Consequently, if it is possible in 0.5 s to receive the information about any process of interest and according to that information create or not the artificial process in the computer (which takes, for any computer, much less than 0.5 s), one can predict a change in the parameters of the process of interest at least 0.5 s before it will occur. So, the results of the experiment described demonstrate the possibility to develop a new class of electronic devices, based on registration of macroscopic influence of the future on the past, which will be able to control and monitor many processes, various by their nature.

 

 

REFERENCES

 

1. G.S. Yatskar. Interference between Past and Future Events in Computer Program. Proc. Institute of Time, Moscow State University,

Electronic Publications (http://www.chronos.msu.ru).

 

2. Home D. and Majumar A.S., Phys. Rev. A52, (1995), p.4959.

 

3. Cramer J.G., Phys. Rev. D22, (1980), p.362.

 

4. Hoyle F. and Narlikar J.V., Rev. Mod. Phys., v.67, (1995), p.113.

 

5. S.M. Korotaev et al. Experimental Study of Macroscopic Nonlocality of Large-scale Natural Dissipative

Processes. NeuroQuantology, December 2005, v.4, pp.275-294

(http://www.neuroquantology.com).